PHO705 Week 26: An Exhibition

Almost the final part of the current iteration of my project is an exhibition of some of the images from it. For this I am joining other members of my cohort in a group exhibition at the Four Corners Gallery in Bethnal Green, London, on 6–9 October 2021. I understand that the space has been reserved and a deposit paid so now the details need to be firmed up. I intend to visit the space in the next week or two because a ‘feel’ for it and an understanding of what might hang where are very important.

In the meantime I have been thinking about how I might display my images. I have mapped out a few ideas using the Kunstmatrix 3D system (Kunstmatrix 2021). This has been useful, as well as fun. it is clear that I need a board of text to introduce myself and explain what the project is about. Just showing images without any context might be a little baffling.

The space for each participant is limited, however, and is likely to be no more than 1.7m to 2m wide depending on position in the gallery. This means a tight edit of no more than 6 or 9 images. At present I am thinking of mounting my images in frames of 40cm x 30cm. This should leave room for two or three rows of images three-across with a text board beside them – and still fit into 1.7m if necessary. That is the plan, but there is still a degree to which the space itself will affect the outcome. For example, I won’t know until I visit and talk to the gallery staff whether a table stand with my book is feasible.

Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. A hanging scheme
Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. A hanging scheme for an exhibition using the Kunstmatrix 3D system.
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A hanging scheme
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A hanging scheme for an exhibition using the Kunstmatrix 3D system.

References

KUNSTMATRIX. 2021. ‘Organize and Present Your Art Online’. KUNSTMATRIX [online]. Available at: https://www.kunstmatrix.com/en [accessed 18 Mar 2021].

Figures

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. Modelling exhibition schemes with the Kunstmatrix 3D system.

Figure 2. Mark CREAN. 2021. Modelling exhibition schemes with the Kunstmatrix 3D system.

PHO705 Week 25: A Video Walkthrough

Now that I have a printed book, I have made a video walkthrough of it page-by-page and uploaded it to YouTube (Crean 2021). The video can be found here:

If for some reason the first link does not work, the direct link to the video is here.

References

CREAN, Mark, 2021. ‘Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596’. YouTube [online]. Available at: https://youtu.be/YX8fFgY6S3w [accessed 07 Aug 2021].

PHO705 Week 25: An Issuu Flipbook

I have posted the final pdf of my book (Crean 2021 A) to Issuu and created a flipbook from it (Crean 2021 B).

The book can be accessed on Issuu here:

If for some reason this link does not work, the direct link is here.

References

CREAN, Mark. 2021 A. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

CREAN, Mark, 2021 B. ‘Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596’. Issuu [online]. Available at: https://issuu.com/markcrean/docs/commonland [accessed 07 Aug 2021].

PHO705 Week 24: A Website

I have now folded my project into a stand-alone website (Crean 2021) using the Adobe portfolio system here:

https://commonland.myportfolio.com/

However, a website and a book are different things and need different approaches to story-telling and presentation. Although the website is similar to the book in content and shows mostly the same images, I have done more to locate the material geographically with my local audience in mind. For example, there is a popular circular walk through some of the villages I cover and a website can give the up-to-date details and generally connect with a wider world.

A key factor here is marketing. The website includes sections on the book and on news, so it also functions as a marketing tool. I can update it with events, exhibitions, more images and so forth as the project progresses. The website can act as a hub that I can reference back from social media like FaceBook and Instagram. So, while the website is a story in its own right, its greater purpose is to reach more people and to put the work out there.

I have chosen the Adobe portfolio system because it is clean, simple and I already know how to use it. My main portfolio is housed on another Adobe portfolio site (markcrean.myportfolio.com). Compared to a WordPress solution, this is a low-maintenance choice which is another factor in its favour.

Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. The overview page
Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. The overview page of my website of Common Land.
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A section page
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A section page of my website of Common Land.

References

CREAN, Mark. 2021. ‘Common Land’. Common Land [online]. Available at: https://commonland.myportfolio.com/ [accessed 07 Aug 2021].

Figures

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. The overview page from the website of Common Land. From: Mark Crean. 2021. Common Land [online]. Available at: https://commonland.myportfolio.com/ [accessed 07 Aug 2021].

Figure 2. Mark CREAN. 2021. A section page from the website of Common Land. From: Mark Crean. 2021. Common Land [online]. Available at: https://commonland.myportfolio.com/ [accessed 07 Aug 2021].

 

PHO705 Week 24: A Printed Copy!

I am now working on my Final Submission which I was able to discuss with my supervisor a few days ago.

A proof copy of my book has just arrived which is very exciting (Crean 2021). The designer and I will check it for colour, missed typos and so forth before ordering a run of copies but in fact it all seems to have come out very well and there are no obvious infelicities that I can spot. This is certainly a benefit of working with an experienced graphic designer.

Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. A printed copy
Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. A printed copy of Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596.
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A spread
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. A spread from a printed copy of Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596.

References

CREAN, Mark. 2021. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

Figures

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. A printed copy of the book. From: Mark Crean. 2021. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

Figure 2. Mark CREAN. 2021. A spread from a printed copy of the book. From: Mark Crean. 2021. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

 

PHO705 Week 24: Submission Letters

Now that I have a final pdf of my book, I have set about writing submission letters (as emails) to photographers to ask them if they might look through it and comment. This is all part of putting the work out there. Besides, informed feedback is invaluable. My project will not be complete for another six months, and suggestions and views now will help me to shape the final result all the better.

I think the key is only to approach photographers with whom I feel an affinity and whose practice I am at least in part familiar with. It is very important to avoid anything that suggests a ‘spray and pray’ approach. I have therefore made only a short list, but of people whose work I really admire. I have also approached my fellow members of Oxford Photographers here, although I do know most of them quite well, as well as a local journalist and a curator. I will be putting the details in my FMP submission.

A great help in composing letters has been Tom Seymour’s Falmouth Lecture on how to pitch one’s work effectively (Seymour 2020). I have largely followed his advice, sticking to the who, when, what, where and why of the matter.

I have also made sure to study each photographer’s work, particularly their recent work, and to check publications like the British Journal of Photography, LensCulture, Source and so forth to see whether they have had any recent articles. I have then said something about their work or an article in each letter. This really matters, I think. It shows that one has taken the trouble to do research and gives a reason that one is approaching this particular person. Thus each letter is different. While this may take more time to prepare, I think that in the long run it will pay dividends. No one likes ‘mass mailings’.

It feels good to have done this and in time I think that most folks will reply, too.

References

SEYMOUR, Tom. 2020. ‘Creating a Press Campaign and Getting Published’. Falmouth Flexible Photography Hub [online]. Available at: https://recordings.reu1.blindsidenetworks.com/falmouth/44e40a05380d0df14d38c59bed78489db86b1e49-1600865116374/capture/ [accessed 29 Sep 2020].

PHO705 Week 23: CRoP and Cover

My Critical Review of Practice is pretty well finished now and I will submit in a day or two.

Getting the right ‘descriptor’ has taken some thought. I have come up with the following as a summary of my project:

Common Land explores the legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596, a rural protest against hardship and enclosure. The Tudor period introduced a system of property ownership whose wounded landscapes persist to this day, expressing violence, inequality, dispossession and social stratification. My project is both an interpretation and a documentary of remembrance of that process.’

As a short summary I hope this establishes some intent and gives the context in a nutshell. i will need something like this not only for my CRoP but also for my final submission, for Instagram posts where space is limited, and for captions for exhibitions and so on.

While this has taken up most of my time recently, I have still continued firming up the book with a designer (Crean 2021). The cover is now finalized and much of the work remaining is converting the image files into CMYK for printing while checking that the conversion from RGB is not altering them in unpleasant ways.

 

Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. The front cover
Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. The front cover for Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596.

References

CREAN, Mark. 2021. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

Figures

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. The cover design for my book.

 

PHO705 Week 22: Work in Progress

This week I have continued with my Critical Review of Practice and working with a designer on finalizing my book for printing (Crean 2021). Following a meeting with my supervisor earlier in the month, the project’s title has now changed to Common Land: the Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596, which is more on point with the project’s intent.

I have had time for a couple of outings with a camera to continue making my project. Three images have emerged which I feel I can add to my ‘starred’ collection of work from which to make final edits come the time.

Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. Near Hampton Poyle.
Fig. 1: Mark Crean 2021. Near Hampton Poyle.
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. Near Yarnton & Begbroke.
Fig. 2: Mark Crean 2021. Near Yarnton & Begbroke.
Fig. 3: Mark Crean 2021. Woods near Begbroke.
Fig. 3: Mark Crean 2021. Woods near Begbroke.

References

CREAN, Mark. 2021. Common Land: The Legacy of the Oxfordshire Rising of 1596. Collection of the author.

Figures

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. Near Hampton Poyle.

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. Near Yarnton & Begbroke.

Figure 1. Mark CREAN. 2021. Woods near Begbroke.